Background Image

Image from page 642 of “An elementary book on electricity and magnetism and their applications” (1919)

Home  /  400 EuroJob  /  Image from page 642 of “An elementary book on electricity and magnetism and their applications” (1919)

Image from page 642 of “An elementary book on electricity and magnetism and their applications” (1919)

Some cool Nebenjob Würzburg images:

Image from page 642 of “An elementary book on electricity and magnetism and their applications” (1919)
Würzburg
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: elementarybookon00jack
Title: An elementary book on electricity and magnetism and their applications
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Jackson, Dugald C. (Dugald Caleb), 1865-1951 Jackson, John Price, b. 1868 Black, Newton Henry, b. 1874
Subjects: Electricity Magnetism
Publisher: New York, The Macmillian Co
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
gative electron weighs almost nothing, the posi-tive electron on the other hand weighs almost as much as the atomto which it is attached. 387. Roentgen or X rays. William Konrad Roentgen tookup the study of cathode rays in the fall of the year 1895. Hewas at that time occupying the chair of physics in the Uni-versity of Wurzburg in Bavaria and was well known in Ger- i ROENTGEN RAYS AND OTHER RAYS 573 many as an original experimenter in physical science. OnNovember eighth he was experimenting with a well-exhaustedCrookes tube (Fig. 428) which was covered by black card-board so that no ordinary light could pass from it to the room.Near by lay a sheet of paper covered with a chemical compoundwhich shines when struck by ether waves of high frequency.Crystals of tungstate of calcium possess this property, which iscalled fluorescence. Professor Roentgen noticed a peculiarline appearing on this paper while the tube was working, whichindicated that something like light proceeded from the tube

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 428. – Typical X-ray tube; a, cathode; b, c, anodessource of X rays; x, X rays. d, anticathode, and cast a shadow upon the paper. An investigation showedthat the effect was due to an hitherto unknown radiation pro-ceeding from the tube, and Roentgen or X rays were discovered.These rays or waves of Roentgen are apparently createdwhere the cathode rays of a Crookes tube strike a solid objectlike the glass walls of the tube. If the cathode rays are focusedupon a bit of metal by a concave cathode, the Roentgen wavesmay radiate from the surface of the metal. Figure 428 showsdiagrammatically the cathode rays focused upon such a metalpiece, called anticathode, and the X rays (x) passing downward. 574 ELECTRICITY AXD MAGXETISM The tube shown in the figure is of typical form, although it isnow made of various sizes and shapes. Roentgen found that different materials held between theworking tube and a fluorescent screen — now called a fluoro-scope (Fig. 429) — greatly differ in their t

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Comments are closed.

Local Events, Concerts, Tickets
Events by Eventful